K0058
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: New2Gelande 2 D110 RTR: Review and (slow) build

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default New2Gelande 2 D110 RTR: Review and (slow) build

    I'm really cheating at tiny trucks this time. I've cheated a little bit before (buying pre-painted beater bodies so that I could run newly built kits while I painted and detailed the kit bodies), but at least I was building from kits. This time, I bought an RTR. That’s cheating. Big time.

    Here’s the quick back-story. Since building a D90 last summer, I have been itching to build a D110. After seeing that RC4WD pulled its previous version of the D110 off the market, I put the idea on hold and even toyed with the idea of ordering one from RCModelex. Ultimately, I couldn’t bring myself to purchase from an overseas manufacturer with minimal parts support and no domestic distribution (even though Martin from RCModelex has an excellent reputation). When RC4WD re-introduced the D110 on the Gelande 2 platform, I had to have one.

    So why the RTR? Simple - the Gelande 2 D110 RTR, like its D90 RTR sibling, is an unbelievable deal when compared to the kit. I know that's hard to believe when talking about a $900 truck, but hear me out. With most every other vehicle on the market, buying an RTR means depriving oneself of the satisfaction of a build AND having to settle for some lower grade parts than in the kit version. It’s always been an easy choice, but not anymore. RC4WD has completely turned that on its head with the new RTR versions of the Gelande 2 D110 and D90. Both come with an impressive list of upgraded parts and accessories compared to the kits (more on that below). When you tally up what it would cost to buy the kits with the upgrades and accessories, buying the kits WITHOUT electronics would actually be considerably more expensive than the RTR. Look at what I mean:
    D110 RTR vs kit price comparison.jpg

    D90 RTR vs kit price comparison.jpg

    So…I swallowed my pride and ordered the D110 RTR. Like I said, cheating. Though it turns out not by nearly as much as I thought, because the RTR will require every bit as much work (and in some respects, a fair bit more so) than any of the kits I've built to date. In that regard, it's much more of an ARTR (almost ready to run) than a true RTR a la Traxxas. Although the box does, indeed, have all the parts you need to get running save for a battery pack and AAs for the radio, it takes some work before you're really ready to run. But I get ahead of myself.

    This thread will start with an initial review followed by a slow build thread. The initial review will focus on the truck as it comes out of the box, which I now have up and running. Because of the dearth of information out there on D110s, I’m going to be even more detailed than usual. Apologies in advance for the wordiness, but hopefully you’ll find it useful.

    The rest of the build will include replacing at least some of the stock electronics and detailing out the interior and exterior. That will progress more slowly (appropriate for a truck that isn't going to be getting anywhere in a hurry) while I finish up a couple of other projects that are underway. So let's get started...
    Last edited by new2rocks; 02-24-2015 at 06:21 AM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Unboxing
    I don’t normally write much about boxes and pulling things out of boxes, but this one bears a brief mention given that it’s different from the normal Gelande and TF2 box experience. The shipping box is quite large, to be expected given the size of the truck:
    DSC00330.jpg

    Once you open it, you’re going to miss out on one of those beatifully stylish RC4WD boxes adorned with really cool pictures and graphics. Nope…this one is all business:
    DSC00331.jpg

    You’ll see the sweet full-length roof rack and the assembled chassis minus wheels and tires, all very well wrapped in foam. Tires are already mounted to the wheels, but wheels are not mounted to the chassis. There are a few other bags for things like the radio and miscellaneous odds and ends, and one of RC4WD’s ubiquitous white boxes for the body and interior. Once you've taken it all out, here's what you get (minus the wheels/tires, which I had put to the side):
    DSC00336 small.jpg DSC00338 small.jpg
    DSC00339 small.jpg

    Although I missed having a box with pretty pictures, there's something to be said for cutting right to the chase. With a rig this sweet, I got over it pretty quickly.

    Overview of the D110
    The D110 RTR rides on a stretched Gelande 2 chassis, utilizing the same R3 single-speed transmission found in the Gelande 2 D90 and the Trail Finder 2 RTR. And when I say stretched, I mean stretched. The wheelbase measures a full 13” (vs. 10.8” for the D90), and overall length including the rear-mounted spare tire is just a hair shy of 23” (vs. ~20" for the D90 RTR, also including rear-mounted spare). For scale calculating geeks, that puts it somewhere in the same 1:8-1:8.46 scale range as the D90, depending on which dimension you’re measuring. Since some guy named thatguy likes threeths, let’s call them both 1:8.3333333th. Those dimensions also make the D110 RTR noticeably longer than the behemoths of the 1/10th class, the SCX-10 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon (12.3” WB and 21.25” overall length) and stock Vaterra Ascender with K5 Blazer body (12.4” WB and 21.25” overall length). Here are a few visuals of the D90 sitting next to my Gelande 2 D90, SCX-10 G6 (12” WB, 18.1” overall length), and Ascender K5 Blazer for comparison:

    DSC00488 (small).jpg

    DSC00485 (small).jpg

    DSC00486 (small).jpg

    With all that size comes considerable heft. The D110 RTR tips the scales at over 10.5 lbs without battery. Once all's said and done, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see this one getting close to 13 lbs. Maybe that's why RC4WD puts the weight on its website in kg only. Compare that to an SCX-10 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, which weighs in at a relatively svelte 4.65 lbs without battery. Anyway, if bigger is better in the world of tiny trucks, the D110 is the new king of the scale tiny truck hill.
    Last edited by new2rocks; 02-24-2015 at 06:32 AM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Chassis, Drivetrain and Axles
    If you’re new to the Gelande 2, one of the first things you’ll notice is how incredibly rigid the chassis is, particularly compared to Axial’s SCX-10 or the new Vaterra Ascender. In this respect, the D110 chassis is just in a completely different league from those other kits. As with all of the Gelande 2 variations, the D110 comes standard with a forward-mounted motor and transmission, center-mounted transfer case, and brackets to mount the servo up front. Combined with a front winch bumper and winch, both conveniently included in the RTR version, this setup provides plenty of weight over the front axle to help with climbing. The other big benefit of this setup is that it supports a full interior, and that's quite an opportunity with a body this large.

    It's important to note that, although the chassis comes pre-assembled in the RTR version, that doesn't mean it's ready for the trails right out of the box. All of the chassis screws are metal-into-metal, but very few of them have thread lock. Before going on the first run, all of the screws need to be checked and thread lock added as needed (most all of the chassis screws in mine needed thread lock).

    The D110's transmission is the familiar R3 single-speed unit found in the D90, as well as in the TF2 RTR. The R3 unit includes all steel 32p internal gears and a Delrin 64t 32p spur with slipper. A steel coupler connects the R3 transmission to the center-mounted Hammer transfer case, which also includes all steel 32p gearing. This combination has proven very durable in the D90 and TF2, and it ought to do equally as well in the D110. The stock 14t pinion is a very good starting point for gearing for most brushed setups. If I were to stay with a brushed motor, I wouldn't change it by much, if at all. But since my plans for this rig include a Holmes Revolver, I will likely gear this taller to suit that motor's combination of incredibly high torque and low speed resolution.
    DSC00496 (small).jpg

    To accommodate the longer chassis and wheelbase, the D110 includes a few extra bits not found on the D90. Instead of trying to connect longer rear drive shafts to the transfer case, RC4WD have added an extended metal coupler from the rear of the transfer case to a bracket with a bearing behind the battery deck. The rear drive shaft connects to this coupler. It’s a simple and effective way to get the power all the way to the rear axle. Add in the included stainless steel punisher shafts, and there should be no need to worry about the durability of the drivetrain.
    DSC00493 (small).jpg

    The D110 RTR comes with the same Yota 2 axles found on the D90, with red ARB diff covers for a bit of bling. These axles include a full cast aluminum housings, hardened ring/pinion gears, and aluminum knuckles in front. The front axles come with a dog bone setup, which limits steering and isn't the most durable setup. You can bet I'll be adding the Yota 2 XVDs to mine. Apart from that upgrade, I'm planning to leave the stock axles, as they've performed well in my D90 thus far.
    DSC00501 (small).jpg

    Suspension
    Both D110s utilize a linked suspension with 3 links and a Panhard up front, and 4 links in the rear. The all-aluminum links should be more than up to the task for the D110. Among the most welcome upgrades included in the D110 RTR are the 90mm RC4WD Rock Krawler Emulsion shocks instead of the Dual Spring 80mm shocks that come on the kit versions of the D110 and D90. The Emulsions do a better job of holding oil and handling the D110’s considerable weight while maintaining a scale appearance. Note, however, that the extra 10mm of shock length affects ride height. If you think it sits too high, you’ll either want to add a spacer inside each shock to limit down travel or, for bonus points, add springs inside the shock to create a droop setup while preserving nearly full travel of the shocks.

    I did notice that, in my example, the drag link and panhard bar are not exactly parallel due to the use of spacers on either end of the drag link that changes its angle. During bench testing, I saw only the slightest hint of bump steer (likely not enough to ever notice while driving), but I will probably play around with removing one or both spacers to see if it makes any difference.
    DSC00502 (small).jpg

    Wheels & Tires
    Like the D110 and D90 kits, the D110 RTR comes with RC4WD 1.9" Dirt Grabber tires already mounted on 5 Lug Wagon Steel Stamped Wheels. The Dirt Grabbers look great and provide reasonably good trail performance. The X3 tire compound has plenty of grip, though the tread pattern can get a bit clogged at times. The biggest limiting factor for the tires is their relatively small size (3.85" OD), which reduces ground clearance. The RTR version comes with a spare wheel and tire that can be carried conveniently in the included swing out rear tire carrier. Because these wheels are fairly light and the D110 carries its weight high, adding weight to all 4 wheels (2 oz should be enough for most purposes) would be wise to help lower the center of gravity.
    z-rtr0021-0.jpg

    Rather than stick with the stock wheels, I think I'm going to go with Gmade stamped steel wheels, like the 1.9" SR02s pictured below. These are considerably heavier than the stock wheels and wouldn't require additional weight. Mine are currently mounted with RC4WD 1.9” Tomahawks (4.1” OD), which showed only a small bit of rubbing at the back of the front wheel wells. It should be easily be fixed by lengthening the front links a few mm to center them within the wheel arches. Apart from that, they seem to look just right. Anything bigger likely would require trimming the wheel arches, which I'm not inclined to do at this point. I'll either stick with the Tomahawks, which performed quite well for trailing and light rocks at different times on my D90 and TF2, or something similarly sized.
    DSC00503 small.jpg

    One other thing to keep in mind when it comes to wheels and tires is that the stock tires and foams tend to sag a fair bit when the truck is fully loaded with interior and roof rack. The 1.9" Tomahawks with included foams seem to hold the weight better, but I may still explore some foams from Crawler Innovations to provide added support.

    Links:
    http://store.rc4wd.com/R3-Scale-Sing...on_p_2906.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/Hammer-Transf...71_p_2214.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/Yota-II-Ultim...nt_p_2942.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/XVD-Axle-for-...le_p_3323.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-Rock-Kr...mm_p_4031.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/5-Lug-Wagon-1...ck_p_1933.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/Dirt-Grabber-...res_p_216.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/Tomahawk-19-S...res_p_698.html
    Last edited by new2rocks; 02-24-2015 at 06:45 AM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Electronics
    Like most RTRs, the D110’s electronics fall into the category of workable but basic. There’s a good chance you’ll want to upgrade at least some of it fairly soon, if not right away. But don’t fret. Since the rest of the package is such a great deal, you’re still way ahead of the game even if you replace all of the stock electronics. Here’s the breakdown of what’s included:

    1. XR3 Radio/Receiver
    The XR3 radio has 3 channels and supports most of the basic radio settings, including trim and endpoints for each channel. The 3-position third channel switch used for the winch is located at the front of the unit, where you’re not likely to trip it accidentally (a good thing). The grip and steering wheel are fairly comfortable in hand. The biggest downsides to this radio seem to be lack of some more advanced features (such as adjustable throttle curve settings, multiple model memory settings) and somewhat downmarket fit and finish. If those things don’t bother you, you should be able to get plenty of good use out of this combination. You will need 4 AA batteries to get started. I'm planning to use it for a while to see how it does. And it never hurts to have a spare radio handy.
    ** If you have a super keen eye for detail, you may notice that the radio shown in my picture above is actually the XR4, not the XR3. Apparently, someone at RC4WD was feeling generous when this particular box was packed (or they were out of stock on the XR3 and threw in an XR4 as a replacement). If you get an XR4 in your box, consider yourself lucky. Just don't count on it...

    2. Water-Resistant Outcry ESC/BEC
    The D110 comes with the water-resistant version of the RC4WD Outcry ESC with external BEC. On the plus side, this ESC is water resistant out of the box. It also has a preset drag break that seems fine for general trailing use, and it has a physical switch to select NiMH vs. LiPo battery pack settings. That said, you’ll likely want to put this toward the top of the upgrade list for a few reasons. Most important is that it doesn’t have programming capabilities, leaving you unable to adjust settings such as drag break, throttle curve, BEC voltage, etc. The 2A BEC will likely be a bit underpowered for the stock servo, and it definitely won’t be enough to power most servo upgrades. The ESC also doesn’t support 3s Lipo and comes with an XT60 battery plug. For now, I've replaced the plug with a Dean's plug, but the ESC will definitely be my first upgrade, most likely in favor of a Castle MMP and BEC.

    3. 55T Brushed Motor
    The included 55T brushed motor performs about as you would expect of a high-turn motor limited to 2s in a heavy rig. Low speed resolution is quite good, largely because there’s no top end to speak of. Without the added weight of the interior or roof rack, top speed on pavement is a moderate walking pace. Although you wouldn’t want to try to make a speed demon out of a D110, a bit more pep would be welcome, either in the form of a lower-turn motor (35T or 45T) and/or bumping up to 3s. This will also be on the list of initial upgrades in favor of one of the two Holmes Revolvers that I was lucky enough to snag from their latest production run.

    4. Twister Waterproof Servo
    The D110 RTR includes RC4WD's Twister Waterproof Servo. This is quite a stout servo for an RTR, with metal gears, aluminum center housing, and 277 oz-inch at 7.2V. Unfortunately, the stock Outcry BEC will only feed it 5.75V, leaving some oomph on the table. I plan to run this servo with upgraded electronics for a bit to see how it performs before committing to an upgrade. I suspect that it will do just fine, and if it does, it will stay.

    5. RC4WD 1/10 Warn 9.5cti Winch with Wired Winch Control Unit
    This is normally my go-to winch, so I'm delighted these are included. It will be interesting to see how well this will handle the weight of the D110 once it's fitted out. The winch specs say it can deadlight 6.6 lbs and handle rolling drag of 9.9 lbs. I'm not planning on any deadlifts, and I'm guessing that it's not likely that I'd have 10 or more lbs of rolling drag, particularly if I give it some throttle when trying to pull out of a sticky spot. I'll update once I've had a chance to test it out some.

    Links:
    http://store.rc4wd.com/XR3-3-Channel...io_p_1459.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-Outcry-...it_p_4302.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/540-Crawler-B...55T_p_823.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/Twister-High-...vo_p_2605.htmlhttp://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-110-War...ch_p_3734.html
    http://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-Wired-W...it_p_3725.html
    Last edited by new2rocks; 02-24-2015 at 06:35 AM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Body & Interior
    Let's get the bad news out of the way up front. The D110 RTR's body and interior don't come pre-finished (they are pre-primed), or even ready for paint and detailing, out of the box. Let's start with the body, which is a hand-modified version of the D90 body. The D90 body is cut in two so the rear doors can be inserted, after which the two halves are bonded together to form the D110 body. The moonroof opening also is filled in during this process. I found the quality of the workmanship to be generally very good (particularly when viewed from the outside), but I did see a few spots that need some puttying and sanding before painting. I also noticed a slight inward bend in the rear panel of the body. I'll either use a bit of heat or, if necessary, add a flat metal bar across the rear to get it straight. Putting that aside, the level of detail in this body, as in the D110, is pretty amazing. All in all, considering my high hopes for the body that drew me to the D110 to begin with, I wasn't disappointed.
    DSC00504 small.jpg

    DSC00506 small.jpg

    DSC00510 small.jpg

    DSC00509 small.jpg

    DSC00505 small.jpg

    A few people have noted having issues in the past with peeling after painting directly over RC4WD's pre-primed bodies. Since this is a new version of the D110 body, I am inclined to paint over this primer without stripping it to see how it fares. Worst case is I'll have to strip back to the bare plastic and start over. I am also likely to take a stab at modifying the recessed fuel cap to look more like the 1:1, which I've seen quite a few people do. I'll post updates as I get to those steps.

    Finishing off the D110 interior is a more involved process. The D110 comes with a D90 interior that will require some fabrication work to extend it to the full length of the D110 body (see picture below). The two options are to purchase another D90 interior and cut out a row of seats to fit in as the back seat, or make my own back seat extension from styrene. I'm inclined toward the latter, because the 1:1s I've seen at the Landy repair shop near my office all have basic bench seats in back. I'll decide that shortly and then track my progress here.
    DSC00339 small.jpg

    You can probably now understand why I'm no longer feeling so guilty about this being my first "RTR." As I said from the outset, this one is going to be every bit the project that any of my kits has been, and then some. But seeing as how, in the past, building a D110 meant having to do all of the body AND interior fabrication work yourself (unless you were inclined to order from RCModelex, in which case you'd still need to do the interior fabbing), the D110 RTR gives an excellent head start.

    Things You Need to Do Before You Run the D110
    There are a few things that need to be done before firing up the D110 for its first run out in the yard or on the trails:
    1. The axles, transmission and transfer case are preassembled and greased at the factory (this is true even in the kits), but they usually don’t put enough grease in. I've opened them up and added some Lucas Red 'n Tacky automotive grease to help minimize wear. To get to the transfer case, I had to loosen the battery tray, which required cutting off one of the adjacent zip ties securing the impeccably organized wires in that area.
    2. There’s very little plastic in the Gelande 2 chassis and drivetrain, so you’ll need lots of thread lock on metal-into-metal screws. I found that I needed to add thread lock to most of the chassis screws, the screws holding together the transfer case and transmission housing, diff cover screws, and screws holding the knuckles in place. Because the screws can be easy to strip, be sure to use a moderate strength thread lock like Loctite blue, not the heavy duty types.
    3. The shocks come mounted but need to be filled with oil. I've started with 30W and will see how that does once I've added the interior and roof rack.
    4. Unless you happen to have a battery pack with XT60 plug lying around, you'll either need to replace the stock XT60 connector on the ESC (I prefer Dean's) or use the RC4WD XT60 to Tamiya plug converter. I chose the former.

    Initial Driving Impressions
    I'll keep this part short, given that my initial driving has been limited to a few minutes around the yard without the interior or roof rack installed. Overall, the D110 drives much as I expected it would. The 55T motor has plenty of torque to get the D110 moving on 2S, and power delivery is very good with the stock radio and ESC. Top speed is not much more than a healthy walking pace, just as I expected. Given the torque of the 55T motor, I suspect this would be much the same even after adding the weight of the roof rack, interior and other scale accessories. It's too early to reach any conclusions about the suspension setup without that extra weight. The Emulsion shocks are doing just fine at the moment after having been filled with 30W oil, but they likely will require some adjustment to handle the added weight after everything goes on/in. I'll update on that once I get there.

    Summary
    All in all, I couldn't be more pleased with my initial impressions of the D110 RTR out of the box. Having gone into this with my eyes wide open, it's everything I was hoping it would be and then some. It looks great even unfinished, and I love all of the extras included with the RTR version vs the kit. I now look forward to the next part of the journey - turning it into my own.
    Last edited by new2rocks; 02-24-2015 at 10:38 AM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    This ridiculuous winter weather (am I really living in the South?!?!?!) gave me the excuse to start hacking up the interior. When mocking it up before I started cutting, I saw that the insert to lengthen the floorpan needs to stay at or near the higher level of the "way back" to clear the shock hoops (as opposed to being at the lower level of the front seats), so I made my cut right at the forward edge of the jump seats in the way back.

    DSC00571.jpg
    DSC00572.jpg
    DSC00573.jpg

    Time to take the family out to celebrate my wife's birthday, so that's it for now. More to come shortly...
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    358

    Default

    Nice build
    I will also take time building mine
    Just something to do when im bored

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Time to get caught up on this build. Finally got a chance to do a bit more on the interior after some work travel. Started by JB welding two 1/4"x1/4" styrene bars just under the cut behind the front seats as support for the new floorpan extension:





    Before adding these supports, I had filed down the 2 ribs running lengthwise down the bottom of the floorpan thinking that I might need the supports to go all the way across...




    ...but then decided on something slightly different. Notched the center of the leading edge of the wayback so that I could JB weld another bar running longitudinally starting under the center of the wayback floor:


    I used this single bar in the center of the floor to get the length of the extension exactly where I want it, because it's very easy to trim/sand down to length. I also notched the sides of the wayback section of the floorpan so that I can add supports along the sides under the floorpan a bit later.


    After I had the length right, I set up the front and rear sections on the bench, cut my floorpan extension to the right length, and JB welded the floorpan extension onto the styrene bars:








    Once it all dries, it will be time to work on the joints and seams, add the side supports underneath, and starting figuring out how I'm going to make the back seat.

    I will confess that, once I got over my initial fear of chopping both the expensive bits (floorpan) and cheap bits (styrene of different shapes and sizes), I'm finding this whole styrene thing kinda fun. If you haven't tried it before, this is a pretty easy project to start on. If nothing else, the need to extend the floorpan shouldn't at all scare you away from the D110.

    More updates to follow as I make more progress.
    Last edited by new2rocks; 03-25-2015 at 04:04 PM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Some more progress. Added the side bars under the floor pan extension, and it's now very strong. After mocking it up, the length turned out just right.




    As far as the floor height is concerned, the drop-off where I made my cut looks like it falls right where the leading edge of the second row seat would be. If I add a full-width bench as I'm inclined to do, the change in floor height will be barely noticeable, if at all.


    I'm leaning more and more toward dropping the center of the wayback between the seats like the 1:1. There's plenty of room below the floor pan and between the shock towers. And since I'm no longer afraid of hacking...




    As I look around, I'm also not sure that the stock ESC location is going to work with fender wells. Since I'm planning to replace the ESC with an MMP when I put in the HH Revolver, I'll probably move the ESC toward the back where it will be out of the way. More on that when I get to it.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Well...sometimes you have to take a step or two backward before you can go forward again. I realized that the stock ESC location right behind the left front tire was rubbing the tire a fair bit as it approached full compression and would likely get in the way of the fender well when it came time to install it. So it seemed like a good time to replace the ESC and motor with the MMP and HH Revolver that have been waiting patiently on the bench. While I was at it, I decided to move the battery tray back to allow me to run larger packs (esp if I go 3s).

    Here's how the business end sits at the moment:


    A quick driveway test of the Revolver on 2s and 3s (esp. 3s) had me in awe. I'll hold my fire until it's all up and running, but let's just say I think this is going to be pretty sweet.

    As for the interior, I decided I couldn't leave well enough alone. The cargo floor height was bothering me all week, so I tore apart what I did and will be rebuilding the floor pan with a dropped center section in the rear. I plan to relocate the receiver so I can get the center section as close as possible to scale (level with the bottom of the back door).
    Here's how much room I'll have:




    I can't wait to get back at it.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Much better...








    And from underneath...


    I'm thinking not bad for my first styrene work. After a bit of cleaning up, I should be ready to move onto the seats.
    Me = pleased
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    358

    Default

    Lol now im worried about hacking mine
    I thought it would be a perfect fit

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default New2Gelande 2 D110 RTR: Review and (slow) build

    Time to catch up on this one. I want to incorporate some of what I saw on this 1:1 into my interior (particularly the seat frames and wood seat backs):


    I cut out the seat backs and made the frames for them:


    Quite pleased with how the corners came out:


    Held in place in the interior:


    I may shorten them a bit, but that won't be hard at all. Still need to make the bottoms and cushions, upholstery, then rinse and repeat for the jump seats on the way back. So there's still a ways to go.
    Last edited by new2rocks; 05-20-2015 at 01:21 PM.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Split reclining seats. Not gonna tell anyone how long it took me to make these...




    Much work left to do.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi There
    Any updates to this build. Im looking at buying one in the near future
    Cheers Rick

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RickGU View Post
    Hi There
    Any updates to this build. Im looking at buying one in the near future
    Cheers Rick
    Hi, Rick. This one was put to the side while I worked on other projects last year. But I will get back to it by this summer and will definitely update once I do. It's a great truck, and you won't be disappointed.
    BowHouse RC
    GCM #tinytruck Team
    Team Helios RC

    "Sometimes nothin' can be a pretty cool hand..."
    - Cool Hand Luke

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •